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Reviewing Senior Care Options With Your Loved One

By Katie Gilbert

Imagine that you are about to start deciding where you or your loved one will receive care. Maybe you are already at this point and are realizing that there are a lot of factors to consider. It is true, there are a lot of factors to consider and choices to make but if you approach this process in the right way it can become manageable.

Take a step back here. To help yourself make the best decision on where to receive care, start by first prioritizing which factors are most important to you. You can try making a list of what is important to you for your loved one to help sort everything out. 

  • What does my loved one want from a company or agency?
  • What kind of care is my loved one going to need?
  • Where will my loved one be their most comfortable?
  • Which place felt the most home-y?
  • Where did it seem like my loved one would enjoy themselves the most?
  • How qualified are the caregivers where I went? How qualified are the directors?
  • Does the place have all of the services that we need?
  • Can I afford to have my loved one live here?

If you noticed, the first items on the list involve your loved one. Ultimately, they are the ones who are going to be receiving care and who will be living in the place you choose together with them. If you can put yourself in their shoes, it will be easier to make the right decision for them. 

Deciding on a Senior Care Option

To start deciding which senior care option will work for you and your loved one, you can begin by simply going out to several agencies or companies for a visit. As Vanessa says, try going to several locations unannounced to help get a better idea of what it will be like in that place everyday. 

Go into each place and ask them questions—dig deep!

What kind of training are they getting? What kind of training are their caregivers getting? Is the training ongoing? Review what is important to you for your loved ones and make sure the place is providing all of those things. Here, you may want to draw on your list of what is important to you for your loved one. Don’t forget to go over that list when you are asking questions. 

A place may seem amazing at first, but you want to make sure it really is the best place possible. Don’t assume that the place is amazing on first glance. Instead, ask how they ensure the quality of life of your loved one. What are they doing to ensure their patients or residents are happy? And are they providing a well-rounded level of care?

Review the options with your loved one.

Get their input about where they would like to receive care. Keeping them in the loop and involving them in the discussion will help make sure they enjoy where they will receive care. They will feel more comfortable this way and will have a better chance of liking wherever you two decide to receive care.

To help you get a better idea of what this whole process will be like, check out Lisa Alderman's story in the New York Times. She shares her story about what the process looked like for her family when she had to help her parents decide where to receive their long-term care. 

Now that you have more information about how to choose a senior care option, we know that the process of finding care for a loved one can still be daunting. It is just key to avoid becoming overwhelmed by how much there is to do. 

For more information, download this in-depth guide to long-term care. It provides information written to make the decision of finding care easier. The eBook contains information on the pros and cons of each type of care option, the level of care provided at each type of facility, and the average cost of  each option. This free eBook is a great resource to have, it will walk you through long-term care, serving as your road map as you make this important decision for yourself or a loved one.  

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Katie Gilbert author bio

Tags: Long-Term Care

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